Eastman Fellowship Alumni

Heidi Stark (2006-2007)

Heidi Stark (2006-2007) - (Turtle Mountain Ojibwa) received her PhD from the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities.  Heidi now teaches at the University of Victoria Political Science Department, teaching courses on the politics of indigenous peoples and on indigenous law and policy.

Judy Kertesz (2006-2007)

Judy Kertesz (2006-2007) - (Lumbee) was a doctoral candidate in the History of American Civilization at Harvard University. Her dissertation is titled: "Skeletons in the American Attic: Curiosity, Science and the Appropriation of the American Indian Past." She is now an Assistant Professor at NC State University in the Department of History and her teaching interests include Native American History, Early American History, Public History, Material Culture, and Museology.

Randy Akee (2004-2005)

Randy Akee (2004-2005) - (Native Hawaiian),received his PhD from Harvard University in Political Economy and Government. His dissertation is titled: "Three Essays in Economic Development of Indigenous Peoples. Randy is now an Assistant Professor of Public Policy at UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs. In June 2013 was named to the U.S. Census Bureau's National Advisory Committee on Racial, Ethnic, and Other Populations.

Angelica Lawson (2003-2004)

Angelica Lawson (2003-2004) - (Northern Arapaho), completed her Ph.D at the University of Arizona, Tucson. The title of her dissertation is: "Resistance and Resilience in the Work of Four Native American Authors." Prof. Lawson was also a visiting instructor at Dartmouth, and taught a course in NAS for the Fall, 2003 term: "American Indians on Film and Television." She is now an Assistant Professor at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, specializing in American Indian Film and Literature.

Audra Simpson (2002-2003)

Audra Simpson (2002-2003) - (Mohawk), completed her Ph.D. in Anthropology from McGill University, then went to teach at Cornell University, where she was awarded a post-doctoral fellowship. Audra moved to Columbia University in 2008, where she is currently an Assistant Professor of anthropology. She is a Katrin H. Lamon Resident Scholar 2008 - 2009 at SAR, and she has a recent book soon to be published titled, Mohawk Interruptus.

Dian Million (2001-2002)

Dian Million (2001-2002) - (Tanana Athabascan), received her Ph.D. in Native American and Ethnic Studies from the University of California, Berkeley. Her dissertation title is "Telling Secrets: Politics, Gender and Race in the Production of Aboriginal Sovereignty." Dian is now an Associate Professor American Indian Studies at the University of Washington.

Vera Palmer (2001-2002)

Vera Palmer (2001-2002) - (Tuscarora/Iroquois), completed her dissertation on the Iroquois Condolence ceremonies, titled: "Bringing Kateri Home: Restoring a Cultural Narrative of an Iroquoian Saint." Vera has remained at Dartmouth and is now a Senior Lecturer, teaching 5 literature-focused Native American Studies courses including an introductory course and an advanced seminar.

Darren J. Ranco (1999-2000)

Darren J. Ranco (1999-2000) - (Penobscot), completed his B.A. in Anthropology at Dartmouth College, 1993, his MS in Environmental Law at Vermont Law School in 1998 and his Ph.D. in Social Anthropology at Harvard University in 2000. He was on the faculty at Dartmouth in our Native Studies Program and the Environmental Studies Program, from 2002-2008.  He is now an Associate Professor of Anthropology and the Coordinator of Native American Research at the University of Maine.

Joseph P. Gone (1998-1999)

Joseph P. Gone (1998-1999) - (Gros Ventre), received his Ph.D. from the Clinical and Community Psychology Doctoral Program at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His dissertation is titled: "Affects and Its Disorders Among the Lakota Sioux." From 2010-2011 he completed a fellowship at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University, and currently he works as an Associate Professor of Psychology (Clinical Area) and American Culture (Native American Studies) at the University of Michigan. He recently received the Stanley Sue Award for Distinguished Contributions to Diversity in Clinical Psychology from Division 12 of the American Psychological Association in 2013.